Monthly archive for July 2011

Rain Drops Keep Falling On My Tent


Camping Tip Of The Day

Storing Camping Equipment

Your camping is a big investment, so here's a camping equipment tip that helps you take care when you store your equipment. Never put away dirty equipment. The dirt can grate against fabric or nylon, eventually rubbing a hole in your tent, tarp, or sleeping bag. Rinse off tents, rain flies, tarps, and other nylon items and let them dry before you pack them away. Hand wash sleeping bags, or at least shake them out and let them air before you carefully store them in their storage bags. Better yet, store it flat so the insulation inside the bag doesn't break down over time Wash and dry all your kitchen camping equipment before you pack it away, and inspect all buckles, webbing, ropes, and stakes before they go back in storage. If you clean and care for your camping equipment every time you use it, it will ensure your camping equipment enjoys and long and happy life.For more Camping tips, visit http://Camping.lifetips.com




Anyone like camping in the rain? Okay, let’s not all raise our hands at once now. Well, it doesn’t have to be a utter pain.

One tip for thwarting the menace rain makes for is to bring 2 tarps with you, one to lay beneath your tent and the other to lay over your tent to keep out rain. Tents for camping can be made rain proof.

Some people elect to set up the tarp so it does not lay directly on the tent. This can be done through the use of takes that suspend it. Or, maybe you could tie it to trees.

When you wake up you shake off the tarps and find a place under the trees to dry them off if there is rain about.

For more camping tips and deals on tents for camping bookmark us here at: http://ComfortCamping.com
Tents For Camping


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Pat Reynolds, Sr Editor at http://comfortcamping.com. Feel free to repost this anywhere with a link to http://comfortcamping.com.

Check out our new section, Camping Videos


Look at what now occupies our top right section… camping videos. The top rated ones, at that! Please check them out and let me know what you think!


Please click here to provide a comment on the above post.
Pat Reynolds, Sr Editor at http://comfortcamping.com. Feel free to repost this anywhere with a link to http://comfortcamping.com.

Desert Camping Dynamics – How to Avoid Thirst and Survive in the Desert


How to Avoid Thirst and Survive in the Desert

Unless you’re a member of an indigenous desert tribe, you aren’t prepared to survive in the desert. Of course, those even those desert nomads didn’t know how to survive and thrive in the sand, right out of the chute. They learned by observation and training, requiring many years to pick up their craft. You don’t have that luxury. But, you do have the luxury of knowing about this camping site. What you read here just might save you on one desert adventure.

The biggest concern you face in the desert is getting lost. I mean, so long as you know where you’re going, it can keep you going. God forbid you are walking in circles or going deeper into trouble. For now, we’ll assume you know how to get back, and it’s only a matter of sticking to plan. Obviously, you’ll need drink to keep you hydrated as you meander back to civilization.

Tips for keeping hydrated so you don’t die of thirst in the desert.

* Looks can be deceiving. In the desert, objects are further away than they appear. A rule of thumb to apply is to multiply the distance you estimate by a factor of four. The relevance of this in terms of hydration is that you can determine how much water you need to have with you. Generally, a human can mosey on along at pace of 2-3 miles per hour along flat land.

* Now, humans need at least 64 liters of water a day in such an environment. What is that in glasses? Oh, about 8 glasses. And, frankly, I’m saying you need AT LEAST THAT AMOUNT. Of course, I’m assuming you travel early morning and late afternoon, and possibly at night. This way you avoid the dehydrating sun.

* Wet food is best, however, try to keep eating at a minimum as it steals hydration necessary to digest the food. But, alas, we all need some grub, but try to mounge on wet foods.

And, if you’re hell-bent on getting out of the desert alive avoid salt, alcohol and caffeinated drinks! Yeah, I know, bummer.

* Travel light. No surprise here, the heavier the load the more toll on you, and the more energy that is consumed. So, wear only the least necessary to keep the sun off you, and warm enough. Not a layer more, dear.

* Try to reduce stress. I won’t try to say eliminate it for I feel it’s easier said than done and setting too lofty an objective, such as human nature elimination, is asking too much. It will just discourage you if you try for the moon.

Try to avoid panicking and running around like a chicken with its head cut off. This only serves to make you sweat profusely. You want to always remember that sweating too much is no good, especially when it’s cold! Sweat is all about dehydration. Conserve your fluids.

* Remember gym class? I do, I had to wear these ugly, pewtred green shorts. Why green? School colors. Ugh. My trick was to always wear sweat pants. I digress a bit. I do remember, however, running around in the heat and getting all wiped out. Then, when I got really exhausted, I’d be panting like a dog, through my mouth. My p.e. teacher was on the ball and would run alongside me and swat me upside the head yelping, “Breathe through your nose, punk!” Breathing through your nostrils actually helps you conserve internal liquids. How so? Keeping your mouth shut keeps your the juices in, so to speak. And, inside is where they belong.

* A common ingredient in survival is to take it slow. If one hasn’t eaten in a long time, they should take it slow. A nibble here, a nibble there. Same applies to dealing with thirst. Take a small sip. Wait 20 seconds and take another sip. Take it slow, sip water, don’t slug it down as if you were gulping a beer to get the courage up to ask someone out on a date.

Okay, you now have a few tips to ponder and file away for the unlikely event that you get lost in the desert. I won’t kid you, there are many other desert dangers such as snakes, mosquitoes, scorpions, odd balls, thunder storms, hypothermia, and so forth. But, that’s for another time. Please stay tuned for more survival tips!

Happy desert camping!

Pat Reynolds, Editor “Desert Survival”
http://ComfortCamping.com


Please click here to provide a comment on the above post.
Pat Reynolds, Sr Editor at http://comfortcamping.com. Feel free to repost this anywhere with a link to http://comfortcamping.com.
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